I’m Not Crazy! Overcoming the Stigma Around Therapy

Therapist Help

“In Hollywood if you don’t have a shrink, people think you’re crazy.” ~ Johnny Carson

Therapist Help

Imagine the following scenario: You go running and roll your ankle. You hear a pop and are in great pain. It turns black and blue and swells quickly. You are concerned it is broken or seriously torn, but you fear going to the doctor for help. What will your neighbors say? Will they gossip about how weak you are for not just “getting through it” or figuring it out on your own? You decide to avoid the doctor, take some Tylenol, hobble around like nothing is wrong, and hope it will just go away on its own.

This example might seem foolish to you…why would you not go to the doctor?! It may seem downright silly to not get help when help is needed!  Likewise, when a person encounters trauma, addiction, abuse, or mental illness, it is of legitimate concern and often necessitates professional help like therapy. In the exact same way a broken or sprained ankle often requires the attention of a doctor, many mental health issues require professional help. And there is nothing wrong with that! 

Recently I had a client look me in the face and say, “I don’t belong here.” She felt she should not be in my office sitting on my couch getting help from a licensed therapist because she was not crazy. She had a fulfilling career, many dear friends, and owned lots of expensive things. She did not believe she fit the image, she had in her head, of someone who needed therapy. In short, she thought therapy was for people that outwardly looked like they did not have their life together and she was not one of them. It hurts my heart to hear the shame she, and other clients have felt for being brave and seeking help. 

When studying roadblocks to receiving therapy, Patrick Corrigan and Andrea Bink (2016) had participants report fear of being stigmatized was the leading factor for avoiding treatment. Participants feared they would be treated differently by their friends and coworkers, that they would encounter rejection or discrimination as a result of seeking out mental health treatment.  Most participants would hide their psychiatric status from coworkers, friends, and even family to avoid being the victim of stigma. Thankfully, in recent years–due in large part to social media attention around the stigma around mental health and therapy–it has become much more socially acceptable to receive mental health care. It is not uncommon to hear about celebrities and prominent figures seeing a therapist; many of them highly recommend it for every- and anyone! I applaud these men and women for using their influence to break the mold and speak up on the many benefits of therapy!

The latest statistics show that the amount of people seeking and receiving mental health support is increasing! In 2018, 47.6 million U.S. adults experienced mental illness…that is 1 in 5 adults! Thankfully, 43.3% of U.S. adults with mental illness received treatment in 2018 and 64.1% of U.S. adults with a serious mental illness received treatment in the same year. 50.6% of U.S. youth aged 6-17 with a mental health disorder received treatment in 2016. Millions of Americans experience mental health challenges each year and millions are receiving help by medical and mental health professionals!

Going to therapy does not mean you are crazy. It means you are smart. Would you sit at home, alone, and let your broken ankle “do its thing” without getting help? No. You would make the proper appointments and follow the advice of the professionals so you could soon be running again. My hope, my plea, my job is to help my clients find lasting healing.  The average delay between onset of mental illness symptoms and treatment is 11 years. Eleven years people will struggle with an emotional “broken ankle” before getting help. Ouch! You do not need to suffer any longer. Make the call–get in to see a therapist today.

I felt sad for the client of mine, and any others who share her sentiments. Just because you receive mental health attention does not mean you are crazy. Just the other day a client, who begrudgingly started therapy at the insistence of their spouse, recently told their new employer that they thought everyone should go to therapy, after they experienced the personal benefits of therapy. While I acknowledge you may believe that going to therapy means you are weak, crazy, limited, hopeless, etc–these stigmatic ideas could not be farther from the truth. I know my clients: THEY ARE BRAVE. They are good people who see their worth. My clients–and those who seek help in other ways–are my heroes and I will always and forever shout that from the rooftops! We need to do away with any and all stigmas that therapy is just for broken, crazy people. It could not be farther from the truth! 

If you have been letting your emotional broken ankle heal on its own because you have felt you do not “belong” in therapy, the time to act is now. Allow a licensed, qualified, experienced therapist, to help you. Emotional health, healing and happiness are possible. Contact me today!

Melissa Cluff is a licensed marriage and family therapist based in Lewisville,Texas, personally seeing clients in the North Dallas area.

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Teen Mental Health: Recognize It, Talk About It, Care For It

Teen Mental Health - Cluff Counseling, Carrollton Therapist

Teen Mental Health - Cluff Counseling, Carrollton Therapist1 in 5 teens lives with a mental health condition and less than half are receiving the support he/she needs. The fear of discrimination and being viewed as different by their friends and peers is a large barrier to young people receiving mental health services. Learn the warning signs and be aware of your teen’s mental health.

When you ask a child or teen about mental health, often they will not know how to answer or will not want to talk about it. This may not seem like a big deal, but considering the staggering statistic of 1 in 5 teens living with a mental illness, this is something we must face. We need to be talking about it with our youth! We need to be mindful of the signs and symptoms so we can recognize if/when something may be awry.

One of my good friends of many years recently told me about an interesting conversation she had with her parents.  This friend of mine had suffered abuse as a child and ensuing mental health issues that landed her in a treatment center in our twenties. She told me her dad admitted to recognizing a big warning sign in his teenage daughter–a lack of range of emotions. My friend always feigned happiness. She pretended like everything was okay. Because she was such a good actress, everyone fell for it, me included. Her dad wisely said, “Children and teens are supposed to feel and exhibit a wide range of emotions. If a child is consistently only displaying one emotion, there is a problem.”

Hindsight is 20/20 for these parents. They wish they would have seen the signs. Thankfully there has been enough experience and research done to give you and I a fairly comprehensive list of criteria to be aware of. The following are warning signs of mental illness to watch out for in your child or teen:

  1. Feeling very sad or withdrawn for two or more weeks
  2. Severe mood swings that cause problems in relationships
  3. Intense worries or fears that gets in the way of daily activities
  4. Sudden, overwhelming fear for no reason
  5. Dramatic changes in behavior (ie. if your once-ambitious or strong willed child suddenly loses desire to participate in activities he/she once did and/or is lethargic or empathetic)
  6. Plans or attempts at self-harm, or to harm others.
  7. Drastic changes in behavior, personality, sleeping, and/or eating habits
  8. Not eating, throwing up, or using laxatives to lose weight
  9. Significant weight loss or weight gain
  10. Severe out-of-control risk taking behavior that could cause harm to oneself or others
  11. Repeated use of drugs or alcohol
  12. Extreme difficulty concentrating or staying still
  13. Adrenaline rushes, cold sweats, and/or panic attacks

If you see these signs in your child or teen, tell someone you trust. Ask for help. A diagnosis of a mental health disorder will not define who your child is or their value. They can live a full life with their mental health struggles.

The best advice I can give to someone who has kids–especially teens–is to be aware of their mental health.  Remember, mental health is a person’s condition with regard to their psychological and emotional well-being. Children and teens are our most vulnerable and innocent population. Watch for changes in them.  Do not be afraid to ask questions.  Get in their business. Let them know you care about and are there for them. Adolescents fear of discrimination and being viewed as different by their friends and peers is a large barrier to seeking mental health services. Not talking about mental health increases the stigma around mental health; the fewer conversations we have about mental health conditions, the more these negative perceptions endure!

I hope that learning about these warning signs educates and helps you. Many adolescents  struggle with their mental health, but do not understand what is happening to them or have the words to reach out. We must be there for them! Please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions or concerns you may have. If a child or teen you know is experiencing one or more of these signs, talk with their parents immediately. Help with mental health is widely available and my door is always open. Please contact me today or click here to schedule a session.

Melissa Cluff is a licensed marriage and family therapist based in Lewisville, Texas, personally seeing clients in the North Dallas area.

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