Clear and Present Danger: Teens and Vaping

“We see clear signs that youth use of electronic cigarettes has reached an epidemic proportion, and we must adjust certain aspects of our comprehensive strategy to stem this clear and present danger.” ~ FDA, September, 2018

There’s a new cool kid on the block according to statistics published by Child Mind Institute. Smoking cigarettes has taken a backseat to the accessible and underestimated–yet still highly addictive–e-cigarette. E-cigarettes are now the most frequently used tobacco product among adolescents; some 2.1 million middle and high school students used e-cigarettes in 2017! This is far surpassing traditional combustible cigarettes. What is the e-cigarette? How does it work? Is it harmful? Because so many individuals are using these devices, it is important to be educated on this new behavior, especially popular amongst teens and young adults.

What is vaping?

Vaping devices include e-cigarettes, vape pens and advanced personal vaporizers (also known as ‘MODS’). When the device is used, the battery heats up the heating component, which turns the contents of the e-liquid into an aerosol that is inhaled into the lungs and then exhaled. Vaping is the act of inhaling and exhaling the aerosol, commonly referred to as vapor, which is produced by an e-cigarette. The difference between traditional tobacco cigarettes and e-cigarettes is that e-cigs do not contain nor produce tobacco smoke, but rather an aerosol. The vapor created by e-cigarettes consists of many fine particles which contain varying amounts of toxic chemicals that have been linked to cancer, as well as respiratory and heart disease.

E-cigarettes look like regular cigarettes, cigars, or pipes. Some look like USB flash drives, pens, and other everyday items. E-cigarettes have many names, including e-cigs, JUUL (JUUL Labs, Inc. is the name of the leading electronic-cigarette company), ENDS (electronic nicotine delivery systems), e-hookah, and so much more. JUUL, the newest and most popular vape device, is sleek and tiny (reminiscent of a flash drive), and can be charged in a USB port. It comes in several enticing flavors like crème brûlée, mango and fruit medley. Every JUUL product contains a dose of nicotine, with one pod or flavor cartridge containing about the same amount of nicotine as a whole pack of cigarettes. The JUUL’s subtle design makes it easy to hide, which certainly explains why it has become so popular among middle and high school students. It now accounts for about 72 percent of the market share of vaping products in the United States and more than half of the e-cigarette market. E-cigarette company, JUUL Labs, Inc. recently exceeded a $10 billion valuation faster than any company…including Facebook! 

Is vaping bad for you?

Regular tobacco cigarettes contain 7,000 chemicals, many of which are toxic. Though it is speculated that e-cigarettes expose the user to fewer toxic chemicals than traditional cigarettes, nicotine is the primary agent in both and it is highly addictive. Nicotine causes you to crave a smoke and suffer withdrawal symptoms if you ignore the craving. Nicotine raises your blood pressure and spikes your adrenaline, which increases your heart rate and the likelihood of having a heart attack.  Additionally, many e-cigarette users get even more nicotine than they would from a tobacco product because you can buy extra-strength cartridges (a higher concentration of nicotine) or you can increase the e-cigarette voltage to get a greater hit of the substance.

Although e-cigarettes have been marketed as an aid to help you quit smoking, they have not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a smoking cessation device. In fact, a recent study found that most people who intended to use e-cigarettes to kick the nicotine habit ended up continuing to smoke both traditional and e-cigarettes!

Why does vaping appeal to teens?

There are several reasons why e-cigarettes are grabbing the attention of the young people: First, many teens believe that vaping is less harmful than smoking (the packaging does little to convey the risks; it says 5% nicotine, which sounds like nothing, so teens think 95% is water weight or vapor). Second, e-cigarettes have a lower per-use cost than traditional cigarettes. Finally, vape cartridges are often formulated with flavorings such as apple pie and watermelon that appeal and seem less harmful to younger users.

What are the effects of vaping?

Vaping drugs affects how someone thinks, acts, and feels. Some may argue that vaping does not include nicotine, but most do. Even those without nicotine still have chemicals in them that irritate and damage the lungs and other internal organs. Vaping also slows brain development and affects memory, concentration, learning, self-control, attention, and mood. It serves as a gateway drug and increases the risk of other types of addiction later in life. Because this drug was only introduced to the public in 2007, there is limited research on the long-term effects.

If you are vaping, or participating in other addictive behaviors, and want to quit, there is hope! You CAN do it–you can kick this addictive habit and behavior. Start by deciding why you want to quit; own your reason and stick by it. Then, pick a day to quit. Get rid of your vaping supplies.  Avoid your triggers. Tap into available resources like apps, family members, friends, support groups, a therapist, and healthy hobbies. Get the help you need and deserve. I am your cheerleader; please do not hesitate to contact me today to schedule a session! 

Melissa Cluff is a licensed marriage and family therapist based in Lewisville, Texas, personally seeing clients in the North Dallas area.

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