Family Fun Day

“When planning family activities around movement it is important to make fun the overriding factor. In fact, don’t even use the word exercise. Think of using games, competitions, etc.” ~Gregory Florez, the senior adviser on workplace leadership and vitality for the American Council on Exercise.

At the end of every month, I do a post on self-care. I have covered self-care topics such as: why it is important, how it is not selfish, how self-care can mitigate anxiety, help us forgive, and boost self-esteem. I have even given some zany ideas for out-of-the-box self-care. These posts have primarily focused on the individual nature of self-care. This month I want to start taking self-care a different direction; I want to focus on family self-care–why it is important, and what it looks like. 

As a short reminder, self-care is any activity that we do deliberately in order to take care of our mental, emotional, and physical health. Viewed through the lens of family self-care, this is any activity we purposefully do to better our family in general–to strengthen relationships, to deepen trust, to build strength (literally and figuratively), and to have fun. Individual self-care puts you in a better place in your relationships; imagine doing self-care activities together as a family unit. It is essentially relationship maintenance and will function like an oil change or tune-up on your car. In future months, I will write more about various emotional, spiritual, mental, practical, and social activities families can do for family self-care, but today we are going to focus on physical activities because Family Health and Fitness Day is TODAY!

I feel confident in saying that each parent wants to teach their children healthy habits. What better way to teach them than by being active with them–as a family? One of the goals of the U.S. Surgeon General’s Report on Physical Activity and Health is to get the entire family involved in exercise. According to the report, Americans–especially those between the ages of 12 and 21–are not active enough. Let’s change that!

Since the 28th (and the last Saturday of September each year) is designated as National Family Health & Fitness Day, I have been thinking about encouraging my readers to participate. Yes, this is a day to get up, to get out, and to exercise (read: PLAY) together as a family, but I hope we all are doing this more than just once a year. Let’s make a habit of exercising together as frequently as possible. Jennifer Hopper, director of Employee Wellness, Worklife and Fitness at Piedmont recommends aiming for 30 minutes of family movement every day…then everyone wins!

National Family Health & Fitness Day will prompt families to be more active. On the 28th, local organizations throughout the country will host family-related health and fitness events at schools, park districts, hospitals, YMCAs/YWCAs, malls, health clubs and other community locations. Local family health and fitness activities will vary widely based on the organization hosting the event and the interests of local families. Activities will be noncompetitive and may include walking events, low-impact exercises, health screenings, open houses, games and health information workshops.

Seeing as how the point of this holiday is to be healthy and active, there are many ways to achieve that goal. Many family-friendly fitness activities are free. You may want to ask each member of the family to propose an activity (only rule out ideas that are truly dangerous) so everyone can be on board. Whether you want to stick close to home or are looking for an adventure, the following are some ideas for you:

  1. Wash the car together.
  2. Host your own family Olympics. Pick activities your whole family enjoys, such as kickball, hopscotch or hot potato with a Frisbee.
  3. Rake leaves together…and feel free to jump in the pile when you’re done!
  4. Plant a garden. You can make it kid-friendly by using planters rather than planting directly into the ground.
  5. Get moving for a good cause. Sign up for a fun run or charity 5K. Almost every event has an abbreviated race suited for a variety of age levels, from toddlers to adults.
  6. Go hiking, biking or walking at a nearby state park.
  7. Visit a corn maze.
  8. Take advantage of your local community center’s pool and playground, even if it’s just for 30 minutes.
  9. Window shop at the mall.
  10. Play a fitness game on a Wii or video game that induces activity.
  11. Take a bike tour of a historical part of your town.
  12. Go rafting.
  13. Squirt gun wars.
  14. “Slip-n-slide” contests.
  15. The old favorites: Kick the can, kickball, capture the flag, etc. Simple yet so fun!
  16. Flag or touch football.
  17. If you have access to a swimming pool, “Marco Polo” and other water games.
  18. A hiking treasure hunt (pick odd shaped rocks, roots, beautiful flowers, etc).
  19. Frisbee football.
  20. Badminton.
  21. Sidewalk chalk.
  22. Chase your pup until someone captures a ball or toy in his/her mouth. Keep score.
  23. The time honored tire swing.
  24. Go on a hike. 
  25. Family yoga! Ommmmmmm.

Remember to try to pick activities that keep everyone moving as much as possible. Keep it fun!

If you do not have a family or live far from them, create your own family group by inviting friends, neighbors or coworkers to get outside and get active with you. And if all else fails, get outside yourself and enjoy some nature’s cure for self-care! 

Melissa Cluff is a licensed marriage and family therapist based in Lewisville, Texas, personally seeing clients in the North Dallas area.

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When Self-Regulation Seems Near-Impossible: Borderline Personality Disorder

Nearly 75% of people diagnosed with BPD are women. Recent research suggests that men may be equally affected by BPD, but are commonly misdiagnosed with PTSD or depression. 

We all have mood swings, and some are more intense than others. As a therapist, I teach my clients how to self-regulate, or soothe, when a strong emotion washes over them; I have to practice those same techniques when I feel an especially heavy emotion. Although many of us are able to regulate our thoughts and emotions with practice, others struggle with it. The diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder may shed light for those struggling in this area. My wish is that by introducing this disorder, I may bring hope to those who want to understand and correct the cycles they find themselves stuck in.

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is a condition characterized by difficulty regulating emotions. People who experience BPD feel intense emotions for extended periods of time, which makes it difficult to return to a stable baseline. Ordinarily, people can tolerate the ambivalence of experiencing two contradictory states at one time. People with BPD, however, feel emotions so strongly that they cannot see past whatever they are currently feeling. If they are in a bad state, for example, they have no awareness of the good state. They view things in extremes–all good or all bad. This includes their opinions of other people; an individual who is seen as a good friend one day may be considered an enemy the next. This unpredictable pendulum of emotions affects how they see everything, including themselves and their role in the world, resulting in impulsivity, insecurity, changing interests and values, and self-image issues. Difficulties with self-regulation can also result in dangerous behaviors such as self-harm and suicidal thoughts and behaviors.  

Listed below are the symptoms of borderline personality disorder. While this list is fairly comprehensive, it is important to remember that not everyone with BPD experiences every symptom. Some individuals experience only a few symptoms, while others have many. And these symptoms can be triggered by seemingly ordinary events and then be otherwise dormant.

  • An intense fear of abandonment, even going to extreme measures to avoid real or imagined separation or rejection
  • Unstable personal relationships that alternate between idealization (“I’m so in love!”) and devaluation (“I hate her”).
  • Distorted and unstable self-image.
  • Risky and impulsive behaviors (excessive spending, unsafe sex, substance abuse or reckless driving).
  • Self-harming behavior (including suicidal threats or attempts, often in response to fear of separation or rejection).
  • Long periods of intense depressed mood, irritability or anxiety.
  • Chronic feelings of boredom or emptiness.
  • Dissociative feelings—disconnecting from your thoughts or sense of identity or “out of body” type of feelings (severe cases of stress can also lead to brief psychotic episodes).
  • Wide mood swings lasting from a few hours to a few days, which can include intense happiness, irritability, shame or anxiety
  • Inappropriate, intense anger, such as frequently losing your temper, being sarcastic or bitter, or having physical fights

The causes of BPD are not entirely understood, though scientists believe that this disorder is caused by a combination of factors. First, genetics: although no specific gene has yet been directly linked to this disorder, research has found that people who have a close family member with BPD are at higher risk of developing the disorder themselves.  Secondly, environmental factors like abuse or parental separation from a parent during childhood. Third, the neurological makeup is different in individuals with BPD than those without–particularly the parts of the brain which control emotions and decision making. This disorder commonly makes itself manifest by early adulthood.

Borderline personality disorder does not have to dictate your quality of life. Only 20% of the most serious cases necessitate psychiatric hospitalization and the vast majority of those stabilize and lead productive lives after their hospitalization. Please do not get discouraged if you have been diagnosed with BPD; you can learn to live a satisfying life with rewarding relationships. Help is available. Recovery options include therapy, medications, and group, peer and family support. The ultimate goal is for a person with BPD to self-direct their own treatment plan and to learn to regulate their emotions. Contact me to today to get started on the road to healing and recovery.

Melissa Cluff is a licensed marriage and family therapist based in Lewisville, Texas, personally seeing clients in the North Dallas area.

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Codependence: Losing Yourself in a Relationship

All relationships require sacrifice. Roommates may help each other with homework, friends may compromise on activities they want to do, and a partner may need to give up something important to them in order to reach an agreement with their partner. Codependence is when one party in a relationship gives too much and loses his/her identity. The truth is that each of us may be codependent at times, and that there is a spectrum of codependency. It is not a terminal disease or life-sentence!

At birth, a child is completely dependent on his caregiver for food, safety, and regulation. During this time, an infant will bond and form important attachments with his caregiver(s), that will be critical for physical and emotional survival, as well as for future relationships. If a child grows up with an unreliable or unavailable caregiver, he may end up taking on the role of caretaker and will put the caregiver’s needs above his own needs. The parent takes, the child gives, and the cycle repeats itself in future relationships, both romantic and platonic. This is codependency. 

In her book, Facing Codependence, Pia Mellody describes the following core symptoms of codependency: Low self-esteem; difficulty setting boundaries in relationships; a skewed view of reality; overlooking one’s own needs and wants. Additional symptoms include finding no satisfaction or happiness in life outside of doing things for the other person; staying in the relationship even if they are aware that their partner does hurtful things; doing anything to please and satisfy the other person in the relationship, no matter the expense to themselves; feeling constant anxiety about their relationship due to their desire to always be making the other person happy; using all their time and energy to give their partner everything they ask for; feeling guilty about thinking of themselves in the relationship and will not express any personal needs or desires; and ignoring their own morals or conscience to do what the other person wants.

Codependent behavior can be learned by watching and imitating other family members who display this type of behavior.  People who are codependent as adults often had problems with their parental relationship as a child or teenager. They may have been taught that their own needs were less important than their parents’ needs, or not important at all. As a result, the child learns to deny themselves of their needs and instead think of what they can do for others. Or they will swing the other way, and learn to be the one taking in the relationship.

Codependency does not have to be a life-sentence. Once the behaviors are identified, new healthy patterns of interactions can be learned. According to Pia Mellody, every adult has an inner “precious child” that needs healing, and recovery is achieved by learning to re-parent oneself. People in codependent relationships may need to take back their individuality in the relationship and do things for themselves. They may need to find a hobby or activity they enjoy outside of the relationship and spend time with supportive family members or friends. Additionally, it is helpful when the other person realizes how their behavior can trigger the codependent behavior in their partner. As with any mental or emotional health issue, treatment requires patience and work, as well as the help of an experienced clinician. Everyone deserves to be in a mutually reciprocal relationship! Please contact me today to schedule a session.
Melissa Cluff is a licensed marriage and family therapist based in Lewisville, Texas, personally seeing clients in the North Dallas area.

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Reconnecting with Reality: 10 Tips to Kick A Phone Addiction

“The price of anything is the amount of life you exchange for it.” ~ Henry David Thoreau

A survey was recently conducted where participants were asked, “If you had to break a bone or break your phone what would you prefer?” The results were astounding: 46% percent of people would prefer to have a broken bone than a broken phone! Before the smartphone era, the average American spent just 18 minutes a day on the phone; today that figure is up to three hours. Three out of 24 hours of our day is being spent staring at a tiny screen…that is 1/8th of our day! Is that how we would prefer to spend our time or would we like to break that cycle and spend our valuable time on something more productive and satisfying?

The urge to pick up our devices is similar to other forms of behavioral addiction. Like gambling or shopping addiction, a small shot of dopamine is released in various regions of the brain through phone usage. That is what keeps us coming back for more, even when we know it is not in our best interest to do so. Instead of improving our lives, technology is actually getting in the way of us living and enjoying our lives. How can we overcome our addiction to distraction so we can focus on the things that actually matter? Here are ten practical suggestions we can implement immediately:

  1. Scheduled screen time. Set a timer for 15 minutes. When it goes off, spend a quick minute checking your phone’s notifications and be done. Push back the alarm to go off every 30, 45, or 60 minutes. You can even ask for help and accountability from your friends and family; tell them you will not be responding to messages as frequently as you used to.
  2. Remove distractions from the home screen. Most of us have Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, etc at the forefront of our screens. If we make those apps less accessible, we will not use them as much. Keep the apps that you want to encourage yourself to use (like those for reading or learning a new language) front and center, and banish anything you want to limit your time with to folders on your second page of apps (or if you have an Android phone, off the screen entirely).
  3. Disable push. An incredibly simple way to cut down on distractions is to turn off “push” notifications for as many apps as you can. Just head to Settings > Notifications to control your preferences. 
  4. Moon mode. On iPhones, there is a little icon of a moon if you swipe up to control brightness and wifi and whatnot. That little moon represents “do not disturb,” and it is kind of magical. It is a glorified silent mode, ideal for nighttime settings or undistracted time at work. Use DND and airplane mode to silence incoming distractions. 
  5. Use a filler. Instead of opening social media to scroll aimlessly, open a different app and be productive. Replace bad habits with good ones like learning a new language through Duolingo, creating flashcards for anything with Anki, self-reflection journaling with Vertellis, or using any number of apps to read or listen to a good book.
  6. Go old school. Many people use their phones as an alarm clock. But because the phone is easily within reach while in bed, many people find themselves scrolling right before bed and first thing in the morning. Cut that bad habit by reinstating your old-school alarm clock.
  7. “Alexa, do what my phone used to do for me.” You can ask these smart devices to play music for you, to check the weather, to read you a text,…the list goes on and on. Use Alexa instead of your screen!
  8. Grayscale. Time Well Spent, a nonprofit focused on changing our relationships to technology, recommends switching your phone to grayscale to make it less appealing. On an iPhone, find “Display Accommodations” and then turn on “Color Filters.” On a Samsung device, find “Vision” and then scroll down to “Grayscale.”
  9. Put it away. Unless there is an important phone call we are waiting for, we really do not need our phones within arms reach at all times. My dad leaves his phone on top of the refrigerator unless he needs it. Think about it–a smoker trying to kick the habit will still reach for a cigarette if it is sitting right in front of him. Ditto for phones; remove the temptation by stashing yours in your bag while at work or in a drawer when you want to have a real conversation at home.
  10. Don’t stop! Keep trying. Stay accountable. iPhones come with a built-in tracking system so we can see just how much time we have spent on any given app each day. There are also apps like Freedom, Moment, and Space that can help us see where we are spending our time and help us set limits. 

No doubt, Steve Jobs’ inventions, in the field of technology, have changed the world. But what most people do not know is he would not even let his children use an iPad. He told The New York Times, “We limit how much technology our kids use in the home.” Steve knew the power and addictive nature of these devices. So let’s be like Steve and limit our use of technology and break the cycle of addiction. The ten suggestions above can get us well on our way to getting off the phone and back to real life connection. If you are reading this on your phone, text or email someone you are thinking about. Let them know you care. Set a time to see them.  And then put the phone away.

(As always, if you find you have questions or would like to schedule a session, please do not hesitate to contact me today!)

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