#optoutside

“I believe that there is a subtle magnetism in Nature, which, if we unconsciously yield to it, will direct us aright.” ~ Walden by Henry David Thoreau

Summer is nigh upon us! Stores nationwide have their swimsuits and outdoor pools at the forefront of their aisles. Most places in the United States are warming up and there is a buzz in the air that comes from the excitement summer brings. I want to share some ideas to help you make the most of the great outdoors this summer!

But first, let’s go over the power of being outside. Not too long ago, I wrote a blog post called, “Outdoor Therapy: Nature’s Cure.” In it, I shared that studies are repeatedly showing that being outside has positive psychological and physiological benefits. Ecotherapy (also known as green therapy, nature therapy, and earth-centered therapy) is contact with nature and is a powerful new kind of therapy. This type of therapy with nature has been found to be just as effective against depression as traditional psychotherapy or medication! And the amazing thing about ecotherapy is that it is free. Not only that, but it is completely accessible to anyone at anytime!

I know what you are thinking. I have a job and/or kids and a life with so much to do that makes it impossible to be outside all the time! I hear you. I know that it is not easy to make time to do something elective. Regardless, we need to put down our paperwork, pause our housework, and turn off our computer and get outside. Yes, we have many obligations and responsibilities that demand our attention, and making time for self-care seems like one more thing to squeeze into our overbooked schedules (to learn more about self-care, read this post). I have personally found it therapeutic to walk a trail near my home multiple times a week. I am refreshed and rejuvenated when I get outside, breathe in the air, smell the fresh honeysuckle, observe the dogs and their owners, and feel my body moving (especially helpful since I spend the majority of my day sitting for hours at a time). I can assure you that you will be better off because of the time you spend outside!

The following 55 ideas will jumpstart your summer and up the time you spend outdoors (and none of them require a great amount of time nor a large amount of money):

  1. Walk your dog (or get a dog!)
  2. Count your steps. Iphones, outdoor apps, fitbits, and so many other technological advancements make it incredibly easy to use an activity tracker.
  3. Listen or watch for birds
  4. Look for shooting stars
  5. Camping (or glamping if that is more your style!)
  6. Hike or run a local trail
  7. Chase waterfalls, soak in some hot springs, or visit a local swimming hole, river, or lake
  8. Go fishing
  9. Plant a garden
  10. Pick fresh flowers outside
  11. Pick up landscape photography
  12. Have a picnic
  13. Go tubing, kayaking, or rafting
  14. Visit local farmers’ market
  15. Fly a kite
  16. Set up a hammock and relax!
  17. Have a bonfire (don’t forget the s’mores!)
  18. Go geocaching or letterboxing
  19. Go hot air ballooning
  20. Walk instead of driving (when possible)
  21. Ride your bike
  22. Take up mountain biking
  23. Rent local scooters
  24. Visit a new park
  25. Go on a run
  26. Walk a mile
  27. Explore a new neighborhood or houses under construction
  28. Dance in the rain
  29. Follow a rainbow
  30. Swing on a swing
  31. Play on a playground
  32. Go swimming (and jump off the diving board)
  33. Go surfing
  34. Watch the sunrise or sunset
  35. Try bouldering or rock climbing
  36. Visit a National Park
  37. Take a walk at lunch
  38. Sit on a sandy beach
  39. Plant a tree
  40. Outdoor BBQ
  41. Summer chairlift ride (preferably during the full moon!)
  42. Stroll around the city
  43. Play catch, basketball, kickball, or any outdoor yard game
  44. Get lawn seats to a concert
  45. Stand on a summit
  46. Go boating or sailing
  47. Listen to the ocean
  48. Organize an outdoor scavenger hunt
  49. Color with sidewalk chalk
  50. Wash your own car
  51. Participate in a park clean-up
  52. Try outdoor yoga (for the sunrise!)
  53. Collect seashells or build a sand castle
  54. Sand volleyball
  55. Set up an outdoor movie with a projector + sheet

Which ones will you do first? Consider making a list of these ideas (plus any others you might have!) and crossing them off as you complete them. Put them on the calendar and make them happen! Allow yourself to enjoy the beautiful warm weather this summer.

If you find yourself feeling frustrated with life, discouraged, or lonely this summer, I encourage you to reach for your tennis shoes before medication. Enjoying a healthy dose of mother nature does incredible good for both your mind and body.  I offer walk and talk therapy for some of my clients; it is amazing what can be accomplished when I spend just 20 minutes outside walking with my clients at the beginning of a session! Please do not hesitate to contact me today to schedule your first personalized session.

Melissa Cluff is a licensed marriage and family therapist based in Lewisville, Texas, personally seeing clients in the North Dallas area.

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Continuing the Conversation on Teen Suicide: How to Help

“Don’t you know things can change / Things’ll go your way / If you hold on for one more day / Can you hold on for one more day?” ~ ”Hold On” by Wilson Phillips

Our community has felt the rippling effects of tragic suicides over the last year. We continue to grieve the loss of students and loved ones we miss so dearly. We know our community is not the only one experiencing the difficult aftermath of suicide, so we want to raise our voice to raise awareness.

Over the last few months, I have written two posts on the subject of teen suicide. Because this is such an important topic, I decided to split up my posts to do each one justice. First, I gave a general overview of teen suicide. Then I discussed the warning signs. Finally, I want to offer my personal and professional advice about how you can help.

National Suicide Prevention Hotline (24 hours a day): 1-800-273-8255

As I said, I dedicated an entire post to the warning signs someone considering suicide will likely exhibit. Please refer to that for a greater understanding on that subject. The main indicators are suicidal talk, self-harm, hopelessness, and neglecting appearance/friends/important activities.

If you see any of these warning signs in a friend or family member, the first thing you could do is talk about it. While it may be uncomfortable to discuss suicidal thoughts and behaviors, it may end up curbing a suicide attempt and saving a life. It is worth it! Some ideas to start this conversation could be something like, “I have been feeling concerned about you lately,” or, “Recently, I have noticed some differences in you and wondered how you are doing.” Similarly, you could say, “I wanted to check in with you because you have not seemed yourself lately.” If the person admits to feeling suicidal, you can then ask things like, “When did you begin feeling like this?” or, “Did something happen to make you start feeling this way?” as well as, “How can I best support you right now?” and even, “Have you thought about getting help?” Finally, words of comfort might include, “You are not alone in this. I’m here for you.” Another powerful idea is, “I may not be able to understand exactly how you feel, but I care about you and want to help,” as well as, “When you want to give up, tell yourself you will hold off for just one more day, hour, minute—whatever you can manage.”

If someone confides in you that he/she is considering suicide, evaluate the seriousness of the situation. Those at the highest risk for committing suicide in the near future have a specific suicide plan, the means to carry out the plan, a time set for doing it, and an intention to do it. Here is a suggestion for how to assess someone’s risk to suicide:

Low: Some suicidal thoughts. No suicide plan. Says he or she won’t attempt suicide.

Moderate: Suicidal thoughts. Vague plan that isn’t very lethal. Says he or she won’t attempt suicide.

High: Suicidal thoughts. Specific plan that is highly lethal. Says he or she won’t attempt suicide.

Severe: Suicidal thoughts. Specific plan that is highly lethal. Says he or she will attempt suicide.

National Suicide Prevention Hotline (24 hours a day): 1-800-273-8255

If it seems the person is in the low to moderate range, offer empathy and a listening ear. Let your loved one know that he or she is not alone and that you care. A teen’s school counselors, teachers, or administration are trained and equipped to help too! If you are afraid to talk to someone face to face, call or text a crisis line for advice and referrals. Where applicable, you can help your friend/family member locate a treatment facility or take them to doctor appointments. Overall, I highly recommend encouraging the person to see a certified mental health professional as soon as possible.

If the person is in the high to severe ranges, and a suicide attempt seems imminent, call a local crisis center, dial 911, or take the person to an emergency room immediately. Remove anything that could be potentially harmful, like guns, drugs, knives, and other lethal objects from the vicinity. Do not, under any circumstances, leave a suicidal person alone!

If you are the one experiencing suicidal thoughts or feelings, surround yourself with people you trust and get help. There are so many resources available today, including the National Suicide Prevention Hotline (24 hours a day at 1-800-273-8255) as well as counselors in the schools. They can be trusted to help you. Remember that suicide closely affects at least six people–often many more! Absolutely no one will be better off with you gone…quite the contrary, actually. You matter. You are worthy of love and life. Life is worth fighting for. Do not give up on yourself!

A suicidal person may not ask for help, but that does not mean help is not wanted. People who take their lives do not want to die—they simply want to escape the hurt. Suicide prevention starts with recognizing the warning signs and taking them seriously. If you think a friend or family member is considering suicide (or if you are considering taking your own life), be brave. Speak up. Get help. Talking openly about suicidal thoughts and feelings can save a life, including yours!

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Continuing the Conversation on Teen Suicide: Warning Signs

“There’s no need to go and blow the candle out / Because you’re not done. / You’re far too young / And the best is yet to come.” ~”Lullaby” by Nickelback

Suicide is devastating to family, friends, and a community. The loss from suicide leaves a gaping hole in families, neighborhoods, schools, and communities; each suicide intimately affects at least six other people. Parents, siblings, classmates, coaches, and neighbors may be left wondering if they could have done something to prevent that young person from turning to suicide. In this post I will go over the suicide warning signs someone who is contemplating suicide might exhibit. In a future post, I will discuss how to help this person, or get help if you are the one considering suicide.

The World Health Organization estimates that approximately 1 million people worldwide die each year from suicide. For those who are not in the grips of suicidal depression and despair, it may be difficult and even confusing to understand what would drive so many individuals to take their own lives. However, a suicidal person is in so much pain that he or she can see no other option. This is why knowing what to look for can prevent suicide and provide help and hope as an alternative.

National Suicide Prevention Hotline (24 hours a day): 1-800-273-8255

WARNING SIGNS

There are many potential warning signs to suicide; the following are some of the most common red flags to look for:

  1. Self-harm or suicidal talk. Take any talk or mention of suicide very seriously. This is not just a warning sign, it is a cry for help!
  2. Talking or writing a lot about death or dying.
  3. Hopelessness. Though subtle, studies have found that hopelessness is a strong predictor of suicide. This hopelessness is often accompanied by “unbearable” feelings, a bleak future, and feeling like there nothing to look forward to.
  4. Loss of interest in day-to-day activities.
  5. Neglect of his/her appearance.
  6. Big changes in eating or sleeping habits.
  7. Withdrawing from friends and family. Increasing social isolation and the desire to be left alone.
  8. Dramatic mood swings or sudden personality changes, such as switching from outgoing to withdrawn or well-behaved to rebellious.
  9. Self-loathing and self-hatred. Feelings of worthlessness, guilt, shame, and self-hatred; feeling like a burden that no one would miss.
  10. Self-destructive behaviors. Increased alcohol or drug use, reckless driving, unsafe sex.
  11. Seeking out lethal means, such as weapons and drugs.
  12. Getting affairs in order. Making out a will, giving away prized possessions, making arrangements for family members.
  13. Saying goodbyes. This might include unusual or unexpected visits or calls to family and friends and saying goodbye to people as if they will not be seeing each other again.

These signals are even more dangerous if the person has a mood disorder such as depression or bipolar disorder, suffers from alcohol dependence, has previously attempted suicide, or has a family history of suicide. Take these red flags very seriously!

National Suicide Prevention Hotline (24 hours a day): 1-800-273-8255

If you see or experience any of these warning signs, do not dismiss them! I will write a detailed post on what to say and how to help in these situations next week. If you need immediate help, I suggest approaching a teacher or school counselor–they are trained to assist you and your classmates with this delicate yet urgent matter. Additionally, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline is available for calls and chats 24 hours a day (1-800-273-8255), and most communities have hotlines you can text for immediate anonymous help. In dire circumstances, call 911.

Knowing these warning signs could save a life. Pay attention to your peers. As always, please do not hesitate to contact me with questions. If you are battling thoughts and feelings of hopelessness and self-harm, please click here to schedule a session. My door is always open for you!

Melissa Cluff is a licensed marriage and family therapist based in Lewisville, Texas, personally seeing clients in the North Dallas area.

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The Magic of Saying No

“Whenever you say yes to something, it means you’re saying no to something else.” ~Susan Biali

We all feel badly when we have to say no to something or someone.  It is so much easier to say yes when people need help–even if it comes at personal expense. Though selfless service is necessary and admirable at times, there are other times where it is more applaudable to say no. Saying yes to everything means you will be spread too thin and will not able to get things done well or at all; it is physically impossible to take on something new without slacking on something else!  This post will focus on the magic of saying no in hopes of giving you the courage to say so when appropriate.

(Disclaimer, I am not specifically referring to saying no in relationships regarding boundaries and physical intimacy–though that topic is incredibly important. I will write about this specific subject in the future. Instead, I am referring to saying no instead of yes when asked to take on additional responsibilities that you simply cannot accommodate.)

Whether you have been asked to help watch a pet or child, pick something up, drop something off, or take on additional responsibilities at work, you have certainly been asked to help. Oftentimes it feels like yes is the only acceptable answer, even if it comes at great personal expense. Saying no means you could potentially hurt, anger or disappoint the person you are saying no to. You may fear appearing selfish, lazy, or uncaring. You want people to love (or at least like) you. So you inconvenience yourself and say yes.

However, saying no is actually a sign of strength because it shows that you know yourself and your limits. It allows you to give of yourself fully, within your limits, and not overextend or exhaust yourself. Having and maintaining personal boundaries can build important relationships by fostering honesty, openness and trust. (I am not suggesting you immediately decline an opportunity to help someone when asked. I believe in the power of service and have written several times about its power.) Saying yes when the answer should have been no only leads to frustration and resentment. Learning to say no can be a magical skill when used appropriately!

Now, let’s discuss the steps involved in the art of saying no:

Step one: Honor your time and priorities.

Time is an extremely precious commodity for everyone. There are only 24 hours in a day, so you must choose to spend your time wisely. Even if you do happen to have some extra time (which for most of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want or need to spend that time? Does it honor what is most important to you? Are your priorities in line? If you are asked to take on a new commitment that will cut into your valued family time, it may make saying no easier.

Step two: Take a moment + Raincheck

When someone asks for help, instead of giving an immediate (most likely affirmative) response on the spot, say that you need to check your calendar and will get back to him/her. If you end up needing to say no, maybe volunteer yourself to help in the future when you are more available. This can assure them that you are willing and want to help, but are unable to at the moment!

Step three: Do not apologize.

A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. Your time is your time. How you choose to spend your time is your choice. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about safeguarding your precious, finite time!

Step four: SAY NO.

You may cringe at the very thought of saying the abrasive, n-o word to someone. That’s okay! There are many ways around this that will still get your point across. Let’s say your friend asks to borrow your car, and you are less than excited about the idea. Here are seven ways to assertively, yet diplomatically, decline:

I prefer to be the only one driving my car.“

I prefer not to lend out my car.”

It doesn’t work for me to lend out my car.”

It’s important to me that I keep my car for my own use.”

“Unfortunately, I’m not going to be able to lend you my car.”

I’m uncomfortable with letting others drive my car.“

I made a promise to myself that I’m not going to let other people drive my car.”  

Notice that all of these suggestions are “I” statements. This puts ownership on you and therefore makes it more difficult for the listener to dispute. If someone is persistent in wanting you to do what he or she wants, keep repeating “no” using any combination of the statements above. Hold your ground until the person realizes you mean what you say.

Remember, saying no does not mean you are an uncaring, selfish person. It simply means you know and honor your time, priorities, and limits. Saying no protects you, earns the respect of others, and frees you to spend your time doing what is most important to you. It is actually quite magical! Setting skillful boundaries is an act of self-compassion. It is liberating and it is your right.

Next time you are asked to help someone, consider your priorities and how you wish to honor your time, pause before answering, offer a raincheck, do not apologize if you are busy and cannot feasibly rearrange things, and if necessary, say no. Remember that there are only 24 hours in a day. In order to spend it wisely, sometimes it will be necessary to say no! As always, please feel free to contact me with questions, and click here if you would like to schedule a session.

Melissa Cluff is a licensed marriage and family therapist based in Lewisville, Texas, personally seeing clients in the North Dallas area.

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How Can I Help?: Supporting Those Facing Infertility

At a neighborhood function not too long ago, Rachael complimented Abigail on her cute children. Abigail quickly responded with, “It’s about time that you jump on the bandwagon and have some cute kids yourself!” What might have seemed like a harmless comment to Abigail cut Rachael right to the core. What Abigail did not know was that Rachael and her husband had been trying to get pregnant for years and were struggling with infertility.

It is estimated that 15 million Americans (one in six couples) have infertility issues. If it is not you going through it, it is your sibling, your friend, your coworker, or your neighbor.  Like many physical health conditions that have mental health implications, infertility often goes unnoticed by well-intentioned friends, family, and co-workers. If you are trusted to be let in on the tender topic of someone’s infertility, there are certain things you can do to help those struggling with this difficult trial.

  1. Learn more about infertility. Understand the causes, the language, the options, the process. This will not only help you understand the infertility journey, but it will mean so much to the people struggling that you took the time to understand their situation.
  2. Take comfort in knowing that it is not necessary for you to give advice. In fact, it is not your place to give advice. It is unlikely that you will suggest a route that has not already been thought of and some options might not be realistic, as you may not be aware of your friend’s personal, medical, or financial situation or history, nor their personal beliefs or values. Though it is natural to want to jump in and help problem-solve, infertility is an extremely personal issue; the decisions that need to be made and obstacles that need to be managed are deeply personal.
  3. Avoid trigger phrases. Though you mean well, there are certain responses that are rarely comforting and tend to minimize the very real fears and challenges your loved one is trying to share with you. A few of these include: “Where there’s a will there’s a way”; “Don’t worry; your time will come”; “It will happen when the timing is right”; “Just relax, it’ll happen when you’re less stressed”; “What’s meant to be will be”; “At least you can get pregnant.”
  4. LISTEN. While you may want to offer solutions or words of comfort, oftentimes, the best thing that those struggling with infertility need is a listening ear. They need someone to talk to and someone to be there for them. Instead of chiming in with possible solutions to their dilemma, let them guide the conversation and then be supportive of their plans, whatever they may be. Just listening will mean so much to the person trusting you with this deeply personal issue!
  5. Help where you can. Instead of working overtime to “fix” situations that are beyond anyone’s control, focus on making smaller decisions and stressors more manageable. Attend appointments. Watch kids (if there are older children involved). Be an exercise buddy (sometimes, those undergoing treatment need to lose weight in order for treatment to be more effective). Help around the house. Supply meals. Pick up groceries. Suggest a fun activity, like a comedic movie or a paint class or a number of other non-baby related things. These daily hassles tend to feel even bigger in the face of major life challenges like infertility.

Lastly, my advice would be to recognize and validate the uniqueness of their situation. Although many face infertility, no two struggles are alike. What one person finds most difficult can be very different from another’s perspective. For some, it may be the physical discomfort that comes from medications, daily injections, or invasive ultrasounds and procedures. For others, the financial commitment can generate significant stress and even become a barrier to treatment. Many mourn the loss of a “natural” conception. This is why one of the most helpful approaches is to remain open to a loved one’s experience. Sit with them in the lows, celebrate the highs, and just be present when things feel stagnant. Hear them out. Hear their story. Be there for them…whatever that might look like!

You may feel completely overwhelmed and unsure what to do or how to help. You may worry about saying the wrong thing or not saying enough. That is okay. Your loved one trusts you enough to confide in you and surely does not expect you to know exactly what to say or do. Remember that imperfect support is always better than nothing at all. Learn about infertility, avoid trigger phrases, listen, and help where you can. As you do these things, you will be able to support your loved one through the colossal trial that is infertility, and can bring a sense of peace, hope, and happiness back into their lives. If you are struggling with infertility, and believe the support of a therapist would be helpfuI, contact me. Let me be here for you!

Melissa Cluff is a licensed marriage and family therapist based in Lewisville, Texas, personally seeing clients in the North Dallas area.

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